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Detailed country by country information on Internet censorship and surveillance is provided in the Freedom on the Net reports from Freedom House, by the Open Net Initiative, by Reporters Without Borders, and in the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices from the U. State Department Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

The ratings produced by several of these organizations are summarized below as well as in the Censorship by country article.

The level of Internet censorship and surveillance in a country is classified in one of the four categories: pervasive, substantial, selective, and little or no censorship or surveillance.

The classifications are based on the classifications and ratings from the Freedom on the Net reports by Freedom House supplemented with information from the Open Net Initiative (ONI), Reporters Without Borders (RWB), and the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices by the U. State Department Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

Between 20 the number of countries listed grew to 16 and then fell to 11. Country Reports on Human Rights Practices is an annual series of reports on human rights conditions in countries throughout the world.

Of the 10 countries classified in both 20, one reduced its level of filtering (Pakistan), five increased their level of filtering (Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, South Korea, and Uzbekistan), and four maintained the same level of filtering (China, Iran, Myanmar, and Tajikistan).A country is classified as engaged in pervasive censorship or surveillance when it often censors political, social, and other content, is engaged in mass surveillance of the Internet, and retaliates against citizens who circumvent censorship or surveillance with imprisonment or other sanctions.A country is included in the "pervasive" category when it: Bahrain enforces an effective news blackout using an array of repressive measures, including keeping the international media away, harassing human rights activists, arresting bloggers and other online activists (one of whom died in detention), prosecuting free speech activists, and disrupting communications, especially during major demonstrations.After a decade of collaboration in the study and documentation of Internet filtering and control mechanisms around the world, the Open Net Initiative partners will no longer carry out research under the ONI banner.The ONI website, including all reports and data, will be maintained indefinitely to allow continued public access to their entire archive of published work and data.Internet censorship in China is among the most stringent in the world.The government blocks Web sites that discuss Tibetan independence and the Dalai Lama, Taiwan independence, police brutality, the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, freedom of speech, pornography, some international news sources and propaganda outlets (such as the VOA), certain religious movements (such as Falun Gong), and many blogging websites.Results are presented for three areas: The results from the three areas are combined into a total score for a country (from 0 for best to 100 for worst) and countries are rated as "free" (0 to 30), "partly free" (31 to 60), or "not free" (61 to 100) based on the totals.In addition the 2012 report identified seven countries that were at particular risk of suffering setbacks related to Internet freedom in late 2012 and in 2013: Azerbaijan, Libya, Malaysia, Pakistan, Rwanda, Russia, and Sri Lanka.Through 2010 the Open Net Initiative had documented Internet filtering by governments in over forty countries worldwide.The level of filtering was classified in 26 countries in 2007 and in 25 countries in 2009.

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